Top 10 Reasons Why Senior Pets Rule

Petfinder Jack Russel Terrier Lila November is Adopt-a-Senior Pet Month!

If you've ever had the pleasure of sharing your life with a senior dog, you know what mellow, loving, happy-go-lucky, undemanding dogs they can be. Having shared my life with numerous senior doggies over the years, those fuzzy, grey-faced boos hold a special place in my heart.

November is Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month, and we, along with our friends at, are challenging everyone to spread the word! If you know someone who's thinking of adopting — or if you're considering adding a new furry family member yourself — please read on and share this list! To learn more about Lila, (right) the darling Jack Russell Terrier up for adoption, check out her page on

Top Ten Reasons  to Adopt a Senior Pet

1. Housetrained: Older dogs are housetrained. You won't have to go through the difficult stage(s) of teaching a puppy house manners and mopping/cleaning up after accidents.

2. Won't chew inappropriate items: Older dogs are not teething puppies, and won't chew your shoes and furniture while growing up.

3. Focus to learn: Older dogs can focus well because they've mellowed. Therefore, they learn quickly.

4. Know what "no" means: Older dogs have learned what "no" means. If they hadn't learned it, they wouldn't have gotten to be "older" dogs.

5. Settle in with The Pack: Older dogs settle in easily, because they've learned what it takes to get along with others and become part of a pack.

6. Good at giving love: Older dogs are good at giving love, once they get into their new, loving home. They are grateful for the second chance they've been given.

7. What You See Is What You Get: Unlike puppies, older dogs have grown into their shape and personality. Puppies can grow up to be quite different from what they seemed at first.

8. Instant companions: Older dogs are instant companions — ready for hiking, car trips, and other things you like to do. 

9. Time for yourself: Older dogs leave you time for yourself, because they don't make the kinds of demands on your time and attention that puppies and young dogs do.

10. A good night's sleep:  Older dogs let you get a good night's sleep because they're accustomed to human schedules and don't generally need nighttime feedings, comforting, or bathroom breaks.

How You Can Help Spread the Word About Senior Pets

It's easy – here are a few ideas. Let us know in the comments below if we forgot any tips!

  • E-mail this post to a friend who wants a new pet
  • Promote one senior pet on Facebook or Twitter every day this month. (On Twitter, add the hashtag #PFseniorpets.)
  • Add a Petfinder senior-pet search widget to your Web site or blog.
  • Post a photo of your senior pet (and share why he or she rules) on the Petfinder Facebook wall.

Learn more about care for your Senior Pet at Portions of this story reprinted courtesy of our friends at

Article reprint courtesy of Animal Planet's The Daily Treat with Janet McCulley

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