Tips Archive

Keep Your Pets Flea Free, Naturally!

Free Dog

With
an abundance of flea and tick prevention products on the market, surrounded
with a great deal of press and controversy, shopping for a safe and successful product
for your pup can be quite a confusing hassle! But not to worry, Muttropolis is
here to help. We have a Natural Flea & Tick Control Collection that
offers many safe alternative options to keep your pet healthy, happy and flea
and tick free!

All NaturalWhy
do we only carry all-natural remedies? Well we know that prolonged exposure to
chemicals is not good for humans, so why should it be okay for your pet? This
is why we believe in finding only all-natural alternatives to prevent and
control flea and tick infestations. While many chemical-based products seem to
do the trick, they can be dangerous when not used properly and have in many
cases lead to serious illness and death in pets. Reports have demonstrated a
link between chemicals commonly used in flea and tick products to other serious
health problems, so it is very important for pet owners to be educated on
what’s safe and what’s not. Let us help educate you. Below you’ll find more
information about the products in our Natural Flea & Tick Control Collection.

Flea Free Food SupplementFlea Free Food Supplement: Keep your pet flea free the
natural way with this food supplement! Liquid based, this formula contains
garlic (which boasts over 200 vitamins, minerals, amino acids and enzymes) and
vinegar (packed with over 90 nutrients such as essential amino acids, helpful
vitamins, minerals and enzymes). When used daily, Flea Free prohibits
blood-feeding insects from biting and prevents the laying of eggs. For more
information click here.

Arctick Non Toxic Tick Removal Spray: A safe
and 100% effective alternative to typical tick pesticide treatments, Arctick is
a FDA registered non-toxic spray that instantly freezes and kills ticks on
contact. By immobilizing the tick before removal, you can effectively stop the
transmission of fluids between the tick and your pet. Designed to prevent the
spread of infectious disease which may occur during the removal of a tick.
Tweezers are included. For more information click here.



Richard's Organics Flea & Tick ShampooRichard’s Organics Flea Dog Shampoo
:
Naturally gentle, safe, and formulated to kill fleas without subjecting your
dog or puppy to the harsh chemicals found in traditional flea shampoos. This
100% all-natural flea shampoo is safe for dogs and puppies over 12 weeks of
age. Also repels mosquitoes. For more information click here.



Richard’s Organics Flea and Tick Dog Spray
:
Formulated to kill and repel fleas and ticks for up to four weeks without
exposing your pet and family to harsh chemicals. Safe for dogs and cats over 12
weeks old and safe for use around children. This spray helps sooth irritated
skin with Chamomile and Aloe Vera extracts. For more information click here.

Shoo! Tag: Creates a protective barrier from targeted pests,
reaching maximum strength within 36 hours after attachment. When used as
instructed, the three dimensional electromagnetic field embedded in the
magnetic strip utilizes the power of the bio-energetic field which surrounds
all living things to create a frequency barrier around pets for up to four
months. Chemical-free, odor-free and safe for pets, people and the planet! For
more information click here.


Flea Dog CombFlea Dog Comb
: Simple and easy to use, just comb in the
direction of hair growth, pulling the comb up and out of your pet’s coat to
remove fleas, eggs and debri. The ergonomic handle is easy on hands and wrists.
Recommended for all dogs and cats. For more information click here.

All
of our Natural Flea & Tick Control Products can be found in our
three store locations or online at Muttropolis.com. We hope to
help you keep your pup flea and tick free this season!

Our Eco-Friendly Collection for Dogs and Cats

Puppy on a globeHappy Earth Day everyone! With an ever increasing abundance of eco-friendly products
and services across industries, it is no surprise that planet friendly pet products
and practices are also on the rise. We here at Muttropolis are very proud to offer a wide, and always expanding,
assortment of eco-friendly pet products.
It is our hope to help reduce carbon pawprints by providing pets with organic dog toys, collars and leashes, biodegradable poop bags and
eco-friendly pet beds, just to name a few!

In honor of Earth Day, and in an effort to educate pet
parents and promote the reduction of carbon pawprints, we’ve put together this
short list of eco-friendly suggestions:

1)      
Get rid of pet junk food. Since nutrition is essential for optimum pet health, it is
important to look for natural and organic pet foods, free of artificial and
genetically engineered ingredients and additives. Look for meat sources that
are raised in sustainable, humane conditions. Many pet food brands include
reconstituted animal by-products, essentially low-grade wastes that humans
wouldn’t touch, let alone eat. At Muttropolis, we carry a large variety of
safe, All Natural Dog Food (including Dehydrated varieties), All Natural Dog Treats, Natural Dog Supplements, and a small assortment
of All Natural Cat Food and Treats as
well.

Poopbags2)      
Pick up poop the biodegradable way. Use
biodegradable bags to pick up your pet’s poop so that it doesn’t live in a
plastic bag at the bottom of a landfill, lasting for hundreds of years to come.
We carry eco-friendly poop pick-up bags, some more eco-friendly than others, with White Compostable Pick-up Bags at the
top of the environmentally friendly list. They are made from 100% renewable
resources, protecting the environment by degrading in as little as 40 days.

3)      
Spoil your pet with sustainable products. Saving the planet can be fun for
your pets too! Choose products that are made from recycled materials or
sustainable fibers. Hemp is a great choice, as it is one of the most abundantly
occurring crops in nature and makes super-strong fabric. Check out our Hemp Star Dog Collar and Leash set that was seen on the CBS
Early Show, or the popular Eco Nap
Recycled Fleece Dog Mat
, made from 85% recycled plastic soda bottles! Our sustainable
product assortment doesn’t stop there, with many more toys and beds that are
made from recyclable fibers, or made to be recycled.

4)      
Choose natural pet care and cleaning products. We carry quite a few grooming products
that are all natural and free of harsh chemicals, such as Richard’s Organics Deodorant Dog Shampoo and Petkin’s Eco Bamboo Pet Wipes and Eye Wipes, all gentle on your pet and the planet. Steer clear of
those brands that produce chemical laced grooming products.

Hempstar
Bonetag

5)      
Make sure your pet always wears a tag. Losing a pet can be trying both emotionally and environmentally.
Printing posters and driving around town in search of your missing four-legged
friend has an environmental impact that could be avoided if you were alerted
quickly that they were found. Whether you choose an electronic ID chip or a
hang tag, the important thing is that your contact information is easily
accessible. Our large Engravable Pet Tag
includes Chrome Pet Tags in a
variety of shapes, Stainless Steel Pet Tags with different image and color
options, as well as Decorate Metal Pet Tags. There is a style and size suitable for every
pet!

Now
is as good a time as ever to start reducing your pet’s carbon pawprints! Please
visit Muttropolis.com or one of our
three Southern California store locations to shop our eco-friendly
assortment
and learn more about planet friendly pet practices.

Alert: In Hot Weather, Pets Belong at Home, Not in Your Car

Dog in CarOverheating Kills: What To Do if You See a Pet Locked in a Hot Car

With summer upon us, temperatures around the nation have been rising and nothing upsets me more than discovering a helpless pet locked in a hot car on a warm day – even if the windows are open. WHAT IN THE HECK are these people thinking!?! Living in Southern California, I spend more time running around grocery stores and strip malls trying to track down the clueless owners of these poor pets who then proceed to tell me they "…just ran into the store for a minute..." or  "…left the windows open, so he should be fine…"  My answer to them: No – your pet is not fine and here's why:

Point Number One: Even on a relatively milld 85 degree day, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of your car to reach 102 degrees – even when the windows have been left open an inch or two. Within 30 minutes a car's interior can actually reach a staggering 120 degrees. Your car is now an oven.

Point Number Two: Even if the temperature outside is a pleasant 70 degrees, the inside of your car may be as much as 20 degrees hotter. Parking your car in shade does not offer protection on a hot day because the sun moves.

Point Number Three: While humans have sweat glands all over our bodies that help regulate our body heat, dogs cool down mostly by panting, which is much less efficient than sweating. In only a short amount of time, a dog with a high body temperature can suffer critical damage to his nervous system, heart, liver and brain.

Do Something! What You Can Do

At least 14 states and many municipalities have enacted laws to address the problem of animals left in cars in extreme temperatures. Under these laws, you, police, animal control agents, peace officers and others may be authorized to enter a vehicle by whatever means necessary to remove an animal. Learn more about the regulations in your area here >

If you’re out and about on a hot day and see an animal alone in a car, you should immediately try to find the car’s owner. If you have no luck, or if the owner refuses to act, contact local law enforcement and/or animal control. 

In my opinion, if the local law enforcement or animal welfare officer can't arrive quickly enough, I say get the dog out of the car  - keeping in mind that you shouldn't put your life in danger either. As well, the ASPCA has created these handy Pets In Hot Cars flyers (pdf) which you can print out and distribute in your neighborhood to help educate people about the danger of leaving pets in hot cars.   

I am going to keep these flyers stocked in my car glovebox – I encourage you to do the same!

-Janet McCulley

Source: Janet McCulley, The Daily Treat at AnimalPlanet.com

Does Your Dog Do This? Sad Suitcase Face

Sad Suitcase Face Do you put off bringing out your suitcase until the very last moment too?

From the very moment my dogs Lulu, Zazou & Kiki spot me rolling my suitcase out from the coat closet, the downward spiral begins. I don't care how much fun they were having eating, playing, or rough-housing the moment before – the absolute second they catch sight of that detested suitcase,  the mood instantly sours and all three sadly shuffle into their beds like sad sacks. With furrowed brows they quietly stare at me as I pack and the worrying begins. 

For this very reason, I put off bringing out my suitcase and actually packing until it is absolutely the very last moment, because it bums them out so much! In speaking with many of my other pet loving friends about this oft repeated scenario in their household of furry friends, I have learned that some actually go as far to hide the suitcase in another room so that the dogs cannot see them packing at all. HA!

Does your dog do this? Do you have any secret tips to help prevent the dreaded sad suitcase face syndrome? Share your stories and comments!

Top 10 Reasons Why Senior Pets Rule


Petfinder Jack Russel Terrier Lila November is Adopt-a-Senior Pet Month!

If you've ever had the pleasure of sharing your life with a senior dog, you know what mellow, loving, happy-go-lucky, undemanding dogs they can be. Having shared my life with numerous senior doggies over the years, those fuzzy, grey-faced boos hold a special place in my heart.

November is Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month, and we, along with our friends at Petfinder.com, are challenging everyone to spread the word! If you know someone who's thinking of adopting — or if you're considering adding a new furry family member yourself — please read on and share this list! To learn more about Lila, (right) the darling Jack Russell Terrier up for adoption, check out her page on Petfinder.com

Top Ten Reasons  to Adopt a Senior Pet

1. Housetrained: Older dogs are housetrained. You won't have to go through the difficult stage(s) of teaching a puppy house manners and mopping/cleaning up after accidents.

2. Won't chew inappropriate items: Older dogs are not teething puppies, and won't chew your shoes and furniture while growing up.

3. Focus to learn: Older dogs can focus well because they've mellowed. Therefore, they learn quickly.

4. Know what "no" means: Older dogs have learned what "no" means. If they hadn't learned it, they wouldn't have gotten to be "older" dogs.

5. Settle in with The Pack: Older dogs settle in easily, because they've learned what it takes to get along with others and become part of a pack.

6. Good at giving love: Older dogs are good at giving love, once they get into their new, loving home. They are grateful for the second chance they've been given.

7. What You See Is What You Get: Unlike puppies, older dogs have grown into their shape and personality. Puppies can grow up to be quite different from what they seemed at first.

8. Instant companions: Older dogs are instant companions — ready for hiking, car trips, and other things you like to do. 

9. Time for yourself: Older dogs leave you time for yourself, because they don't make the kinds of demands on your time and attention that puppies and young dogs do.

10. A good night's sleep:  Older dogs let you get a good night's sleep because they're accustomed to human schedules and don't generally need nighttime feedings, comforting, or bathroom breaks.

How You Can Help Spread the Word About Senior Pets

It's easy – here are a few ideas. Let us know in the comments below if we forgot any tips!

  • E-mail this post to a friend who wants a new pet
  • Promote one senior pet on Facebook or Twitter every day this month. (On Twitter, add the hashtag #PFseniorpets.)
  • Add a Petfinder senior-pet search widget to your Web site or blog.
  • Post a photo of your senior pet (and share why he or she rules) on the Petfinder Facebook wall.

Learn more about care for your Senior Pet at Petfinder.com. Portions of this story reprinted courtesy of our friends at Petfinder.com


Article reprint courtesy of Animal Planet's The Daily Treat with Janet McCulley

Top 4 Halloween Safety Tips

Devil-pot-xs

Ginger or MaryAnne? Maybe neither.

As you, your ghosts, goblins and gangs of Lady Gaga's all head out for Halloween festivities this weekend, we here at the Daily Treat command center feel it our civic duty to share with you these important safety tips to prevent you from ending up in some bad YouTube video or on TMZ. For other fun Halloween pet costume and party planning ideas, check out Animal Planet's Halloween Party Guide for all things Spook-tacular!

1) Costume Common Sense

If you do decide to dress your pet , make sure the costume doesn't restrain your pet in any way and that your pet's vision is not impaired. Don’t force the issue: If Rover doesn't want to dress up as Lara Croft Tombraider, then Rover shouldn't be Lara Croft…maybe he'd actually prefer Judge Judy.

2) Candy Patrol

As much as your dog or cat may beg for some of your Halloween candy, always remember that chocolate is DEADLY  to them in any amount. Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine, which is poisonous to dogs. Symptoms can include vomiting or diarrhea. That said, be sure not to keep that bowl of Halloween candy for trick or treaters anywhere within your pets reach, as it may be too tempting for pets to resist.

If your pet does eat chocolate, immediately call your vet or the Poison Control 1-800-222-1222. Post this number by your phone or on your refrigerator so it can be easily located in an emergency.

3) "Pretty decorations…me want eat decorations…"

Other possible hazards include decorations that could be ingested, such as fake spiderwebs, as well as electric lights and jack-o-lantern candles.

4) "Scary lady in spandex make me want to get the heck out of here…"

Pets may also be spooked by people wearing costumes, and may try to escape or become aggressive. So be sure they are wearing their collar and pet identification tags or consider tucking them into their bed early  in an enclosed room so they cannot run out the front door!

Did I forget anything? Share your ideas in the comments below and Happy Halloween!

Leave Your Pets at Home in Hot Weather


Dog in CarOverheating Kills: What To Do if You See a Pet Locked in a Hot Car

Temperatures around the nation have been off the charts lately and nothing upsets me more more than discovering a helpless pet locked in a hot car on a warm day.  WHAT IN THE HECK are these people thinking!?! Living in Southern California, I spend more time running around grocery stores and strip malls trying to find the clueless owners of these poor pets who then proceed to tell me they "…just ran into the store for a minute..." or  "…left the windows open, so he should be fine…"  My answer to them: No – your pet is not fine and here's why:

Point Number One: Even on a relatively milld 85 degree day, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of your car to reach 102 degrees – even when the windows have been left open an inch or two. Within 30 minutes a car's interior can actually reach a staggering 120 degrees. Your car is now an oven.

Point Number Two: Even if the temperature outside is a pleasant 70 degrees, the inside of your car may be as much as 20 degrees hotter. Parking your car in shade does not offer protection on a hot day because the sun moves.

Point Number Three: While humans have sweat glands all over our bodies that help regulate our body heat, dogs cool down mostly by panting, which is much less efficient than sweating. In only a short amount of time, a dog with a high body temperature can suffer critical damage to his nervous system, heart, liver and brain.

Do Something! What You Can Do

At least 14 states and many municipalities have enacted laws to address the problem of animals left in cars in extreme temperatures. Under these laws, you, police, animal control agents, peace officers and others may be authorized to enter a vehicle by whatever means necessary to remove an animal. Learn more about the regulations in your area here >

If you’re out and about on a hot day and see an animal alone in a car, you should immediately try to find the car’s owner. If you have no luck, or if the owner refuses to act, contact local law enforcement and/or animal control. 

In my opinion, if the local law enforcement or animal welfare officer can't arrive quickly enough, I say get the dog out of the car  - keeping in mind that you shouldn't put your life in danger either. As well, the ASPCA has created these handy Pets In Hot Cars flyers (pdf) which you can print out and distribute in your neighborhood to help educate people about the danger of leaving pets in hot cars.   

I am going to keep these flyers stocked in my car glovebox – I encourage you to do the same!

Article reprint courtesy of Animal Planet's The Daily Treat with Janet McCulley

The Doggy in the Window: 10 Reasons Not to Buy a Puppy From a Pet Store


boxer puppy
Dogster's Top 10 Reasons Not to Buy a Puppy From a Pet Store

If you are a dog lover, then you're all too familiar with that sick feeling you get in the pit of your stomach when you pass by a pet store that sells puppies. I'm not referring to the pet stores that have adoption days featuring shelter pups available for adoption, like we offer at Muttropolis, but I'm instead referring to the pet stores where there are cages upon cages of poor furry souls who are products of deplorable conditions at puppy mills. I see these poor pups and like many, I want to "rescue" them from their life in a cage – but in doing so – you end up supporting a very shady industry, where poor dogs are often bred far too frequently, kept cramped together in squalor and are not socialized with humans. 

Some pet stores do obtain their puppies from commercial kennels regulated by the Department of Agriculture. However, even these pups tend to be unhealthy and unsocialized. This is partly due to the fact that commercial kennels tend to breed many different breeds in one facility and they breed for quantity, not quality. So, before you buy that cute puppy in the window, consider the downsides of pet store pups:

10 Reasons Not to Buy a Puppy From a Pet Store

1. Bad Health: Because so many pet store pups come from puppy mills, they are not the result of careful breeding and they are usually not well cared for before coming to the store. Some common illnesses and conditions are neurological problems, eye problems, hip dysplasia, blood disorders and Canine Parvovirus.

2. Behavioral Problems: Because breeding is indiscriminate, behavioral problems are not weeded out generationally. You'll also find that a pet store's staff is not likely to have any training in dealing with behavior issues so the puppies continue to do the wrong things, which become habit.

3. No Socialization: Pet stores pups are often pulled away from their litter at far too young an age, often at only four or five weeks. The earliest a puppy should be separated from his pack is eight weeks and most reputable breeders will say at least 10 weeks. This lack of time socializing with his siblings means that puppy will not develop important canine skills. Likewise, a puppy who has not been handled by people from about three weeks will not naturally socialize well with them.

4. The Downfall of the Standard: In a broad sense, purchasing a puppy from a pet store and then breeding her means you are ruining the standard of that breed because the previous breeders were not concerned with it.

5. Lack of Information: A member of a pet store staff is not an expert on a breed and often not on dogs in general. Purchasing a puppy from a store means you will not get the lowdown on that breed or likely help with any behavioral or other questions.

6. Return at Your Puppy's Peril: Most pet stores do offer a warranty of sorts where you can bring the puppy back if he has problems. They don't tend to tell customers that the puppy's fate, once returned, is usually euthanization.

7. Housebreaking is a Chore: Pet store puppies have spent all their short lives in cages. They do not have the opportunity to develop the natural canine instinct of eliminating away from their food and bed. This causes problems when you try to housebreak them.

8. What You See Isn't Necessarily What You Get: If you see what looks like a Maltese in the window, you may find, as she grows, that there's a little Maltese in there somewhere but mostly she looks like a Terrier. There is no guarantee you will get a purebred dog if that's what you're after.

9. Poor Value: A puppy from a pet store generally costs between $400 and $2,000. This is often more than you'd pay at a reputable breeder who can ensure you get a healthy puppy and provide support afterward.

10. Questionable Pedigree: You're paying for a pedigree, or AKC papers, when you buy a puppy from a pet store but it's very likely that it's not genuine. If the papers are genuine, it still doesn't mean the puppy is a good example of its breed – you need a reputable breeder to prove that.

What are your options other than pet store puppies? Find a reputable breeder or adopt your next dog from the local animal shelter or breed-specific rescues! Learn more at Dogster.com or Petfinder.com.

via Dogster

Article reprint courtesy of Animal Planet's The Daily Treat with Janet McCulley

Here Kitty, Kitty! New iPhone App Rallies Stubborn Cats

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Good news for anyone who has ever had difficulty luring their cat out from under a bed, up a tree, from under the car or anywhere else! A cat-loving University professor from Indiana and two of his students have developed Here Kitty, Kitty! –  a feline-friendly iPhone (and iPad) application that provides a creative and fun way to help you find your lost (…or stubborn) cat. 

Available on iTunes, Here Kitty, Kitty! provides a fun way for users to attract their cats with familiar sounds that will bring the feline around when they don't come when called. It features the sounds of a cat meowing, a man calling a cat and an electric can opener readying a can of kitty nom-noms.

Here Kitty, Kitty! just launched a few weeks ago and so the App reviews are limited, but the few that do exist on the site are very positive. Let me know if it works for your cat!

Need help getting your dog to come? Check out our review of the Dog Whistler iPhone App!